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Hennessey 0-185 mph 2015 Z06 Corvette Test Run [VIDEO]

Apr
27

Source: Hennessey

2015 Callaway Corvette Z06 to Debut at National Corvette Museum

Apr
24

2015 Callaway Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Front AngleThe 2015 Callaway Corvette Z06 will debut at the National Corvette Museum C7 Bash in Bowling Green, Kentucky, April 23 through April 25. Here’s a sneak peek at the new package.

Based on Chevrolet’s track-proven Z06, Callaway engineers’ no-compromise approach takes this Corvette to an astounding power level. While advertised Callaway horsepower and torque are pending final validation, the Callaway package adds Callaway’s new GenThree supercharger system with 32% more displacement than the stock Z06 supercharger, improved manifold design and unique triple-element intercooling system.

1957 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible

Apr
21

1957 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible Front Angle1957 saw the Eldorado (in both Biarritz convertible and Seville hardtop bodystyles) with a revised rear-end design featuring a low, downswept fenderline capped by a pointed, in-board fin. The rear fenders were commonly referred to as “chipmunk cheeks”. This concept was used for two years, but did not spawn any imitators. Series 62 Eldorados (as distinct from the Series 70 Eldorado Brougham) were further distinguished by the model name above a V-shaped rear deck ornament and on the front fenders. The rear fender and deck contour was trimmed with broad, sculptured stainless steel beauty panels. Also seen were “shark” style fins pointing towards the back of the cars. A three section built in front bumper was another exclusive trait of the Series 62 Eldorados, which came with a long list of standard features. Four specially-built 4-door hardtop Eldorado Sedan Sevilles were also built in 1957.

Solar Roadways

Apr
21

The possible future of our nation’s roadways has received seed funding via crowdfunding.  The technology is called Solar Roadways and it received a little over 2 million dollars in funding on IndieGoGo last year.  Just imagine covering all roads in the country with thick glass hexagons that are solar powered and contain heat elements and LEDs for lighting among other things.  That’s the concept behind solar roadways.

Scott and Julie Brusaw are the husband and wife team behind the concept.  They have spent the better part of the last decade developing the modular hexagon panels that would make up solar-powered roads.  These panels offer some amazing benefits. 

About Cabin Air Filters

Apr
21

There’s a new kind of filter in cars and trucks today and you may not know about it.  It’s the filter that cleans the outside air before it gets pulled into your cabin by a ventilation fan.  This paper-based filter prevents pollen, dust and other airborne particles from entering.  If you, or a passenger, have any allergies, this filter can provide quite a bit of relief from airborne irritants.

Most automotive manufacturers suggest that your change your cabin air filter every 10,000 to 15,000 miles in standard environments.  Perhaps more often depending on where you drive – especially if you drive in urban environments with poor air quality or in desert climates with lots of dust.

You may be able to do this yourself.  Many cabin air filters are located behind the glove box.  Often, they can be accessed by dropping the glove box from its support fasteners.  In other vehicles, the cabin air filter may be under the dashboard and might not be so easy to reach.  In this case, you might want your car dealer to perform the job for you.

Ditching the Alternator

Apr
21

Conserving energy often means finding new sources of energy within a given “system”, like an automobile or truck, and using it.  For example, many hybrid cars have regenerative braking systems that extract energy when the brakes are applied. Essentially each wheel has a small electric generator in it that when engaged, produces electrical power.  This power, which is normally wasted as heat,  is fed back into the vehicle’s batteries.  By doing this, one can see an average of 10 to 15 percent improvement in fuel efficiency.

Should You Replace Your Power Steering Fluid?

Apr
21

Replacing the power-steering fluid is not usually listed as a maintenance item for most cars and trucks.  You may have read that it’s a good idea or heard a mechanic give you a pitch for it, though.  The question is:  Should you do it?

Well, it’s a matter of interpretation to some degree.  The truth be told, power steering fluid does age.  When it is new, it is usually a clear-ruby color similar to many cough syrups.  As time goes on, usually many years, the ruby color turns darker as small amounts of dirt and other contaminants become suspended in the fluid.  To many mechanics this indicates that the fluid is old and should be changed.

Are Your Shocks Worn Out?

Apr
21

What exactly do the shock absorbers on your car do?  Silly question, right?  Everyone knows they absorb the bumps and shocks that occur when you drive your car on bumpy roads.  If a car didn’t have shock absorbers, every time you hit a bump, the whole car would jump around?

Well, as it turns out, they have nothing to do with absorbing shocks.  The springs, either coil or leaf-style, that are on each wheel of your car absorb the shocks and bumps.  What the shock absorbers do is dampen the bouncing of the springs so your car doesn’t bounce up and down after hitting a bump.  Technically, shocks should be called “Spring Dampeners” not “Shock Absorbers”.

There are many warning signs that tell you when your shock absorbers need replacing.  When you hit a bump, does your car bounce up and down several times before settling down?  If so, your shocks may need to be replaced. Other signs are exaggerated body lean in corners or your front end dives down when you apply your brakes hard.

Attention Assist Monitors The Driver’s Fatigue Level

Apr
21

In 2013, fatalities in the United States due to car accidents totaled 32,719.  While no exact number exists for the percentage of that number that is due to driver fatigue, insurance companies often attribute it to about 10%. Essentially that means that almost 3300 people per year die as a result of falling asleep at the wheel.

Wouldn’t it be nice if technology in your car could sense when you were falling asleep behind the wheel and woke you up before an accident occurred?  That is the concept around a technology being developed by Harke, a European technology consortium.

Harken explains that they have a set of smart textiles: “a combination of fibers with electrical properties” worked into the seat belt and seat covers.  Utilizing these conductors, the driver’s heart and breathing rates can be monitored and analyzed by sophisticated signal processing units.  If it appears that the drive is nodding off, a “wake up” alarm can be sounded.  This alarm could be everything from an audible noise to a vibrating steering wheel.